Flavor Flav Domestic Dispute: New Details Emerge

via MTV: 

 

Flavor Flav in Las Vegas police custody on Wednesday

 

Flavor Flav was arrested at his Las Vegas home on Wednesday after a domestic dispute, and now a police report has revealed further details of what took place before officials were called in.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police told ABC News Action 13 that the altercation took place around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, and they responded to a call from a woman who said that she had been in a fight with her fiancé, who also threatened her son.

Police said that when they arrived, they could still hear an argument going on inside Flav’s house on the 7800 block of Via Venture Court. His fiancée, Elizabeth Trujillo, explained that a fight between the couple started after an argument over his infidelity and things spiraled out of control. Trujillo says that she was thrown to the floor twice during the argument, and when her 17-year-old son tried to defend her, he was also threated.

The rapper, born William Drayton Jr., reportedly began to wrestle with Trujillo’s son and eventually grabbed two knives from the kitchen, chasing him upstairs where he locked himself in bedroom. At this point Trujillo says that the former Public Enemy rapper kicked in the door and continued to threaten her son.

Flavor Flav has denied chasing the teenager in the midst of the fight with his fiancée, but police say two knives were found on the kitchen floor, and he sustained a cut from one of them.

He was arrested and taken to the Clark County Detention Center, where he was later bailed out with $23,000 and then appeared in court early on Thursday (October 18). Flav is facing felony assault with a deadly weapon and misdemeanor domestic violence charges.

GUTSY: Expedia’s Gay Marriage Ad Is Narrated By A Homophobic Father

via Business Insider: 

 

Expedia is publishing a series of videos under the rubric “find yours” which focus on why Americans make the journeys they do
.

Sounds dull, right? In fact most of the videos in the series have received fewer than 10,000 views on YouTube.

The latest video, however, got more than 2.2 million views since Oct. 2. It’s an unexpectedly moving tale told by retired business owner Artie Goldstein, who describes the less-than-enthusiastic reaction he had to his daughter Vickie’s announcement that she was going to marry another woman. “That startled me. I told her, this is not the dream I had for my daughter,” he says.

He books a plane ticket anyway, and the ad follows him on the trip. At one point he drives past a church, and the shot is delivered in silence.

(Of course, the ad has a happy ending when he sees his daughter in her wedding dress.)

The spot — made by agency 180LA for Expedia clients senior marketing director Vic Walia and vp/gm Joe Megibow — is unexpectedly subtle, for a major brand.

Gay-audience targeted campaigns are commonplace in advertising these days, and they already have their own set cliches (smiling whitebread couples in spotlessly tasteful homes, rough-housing with their adorable kids, etc.).

What makes this ad worthy of note is the fact that it’s told entirely from the point of view of a member of a generation that, frankly, isn’t entirely on board with the whole equal rights thing.

The ad thus addresses its supporters and critics at the same time — which is what makes it so clever. Take a look:

 

Hulk Hogan leaked his own sex tape: Best friend

via DNA: 

 

Bubba the Love Sponge has implied Hulk Hogan leaked his own sex tape.

The DJ lashed out at his former best friend – who can be seen cavorting with Bubba’s estranged wife Heather Clem in the video – and thinks the “self-centred” wrestler could have released the footage for publicity.

Speaking on his radio show, Bubba – who is believed to feature at the end of the tape bragging about how he could sell the footage – said: “I’m gonna be honest with you, I have not seen the tape … including me supposedly bragging and being a horse’s ass.

“At the end of the day, I can’t even comment on the validity … [Hulk] could have had something to do with the leak of it.”

Hulk is suing Bubba and Heather for $100 million, claiming they filmed him without his consent.

However, Bubba issued a reminder to Hulk live on air, saying: “Nobody put a gun to your head” and insisted it was consensual.

He also lashed out at his former friend, defending the wrestler’ ex-wife Linda and calling Hulk’s daughter Brooke talentless.

The ‘TNA IMPACT Wrestling’ star’s sex tape was previously thought to have been leaked by a disgruntled ex-employee of Bubba.

Hulk recently called in the FBI because he is determined to get to the bottom of the violation of his privacy.

He insisted, “I have braced my family, there could be another one. I have no idea. I’ve never made a tape. I swear to god I wasn’t in on this.”

How These Photos Of ‘Scared Bros At A Haunted House’ Became The Biggest Viral Campaign Of The Season

via Business Insider: 

 

Five baseball cap-wearing bros, cowered in a corner, eyes wide, limbs akimbo, clutching at each others’ poorly developed pecs.

 

It’s no wonder that the awe-inspiring photos of “Scared Bros at a Haunted House” went insanely viral first in 2011 and then again in 2012.

 

Although meme-machine BuzzFeed is responsible for pouring gallons of gasoline on the photos’ flames, what some viewers don’t realize is that the pictures were part of an intricate, borderline genius, marketing campaign created by Nightmares Fear Factory, located on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls, to promote its haunted house.

How it got started

“People just started noticing and think we just started posting pictures last year,” Vee Popat, Nightmares Fear Factory’s social media and marketing strategist, told us. “But we’ve been doing this consistently every day for 365 days for years.” (That’s right, “bros” are even photographed freaking out on Christmas).

Ten years ago, founder Frank Lapenna got the idea to take pictures of people at key scare-moments in the pitch black maze from Disneyland and other theme parks that sold photos of guests on roller coasters.

“So 10 years, he started standing in this one spot and taking picture of people, and we’d all laugh at them,” Popat said.

Eventually they installed a still camera and video camera that would capture the exact moment of optimal fear in the pitch dark, and a tradition was born.

Since it was a pre-Facebook era, and MySpace wasn’t really a photo sharing site, Lapenna tried to make the content social the only way he knew how. “He thought, why don’t we email people the jpeg,” Popat said. “For the obvious reasons, they’ll share it with their friends.”

And so it began.

How it went viral

Popat began working at Nightmares Fear Factory in 2009, and he immediately created a Facebook page for the haunted house to share daily photos and frequent videos.

Understanding the power of the viral video, he never allowed himself to say the “V” word aloud, Popat started uploading videos on YouTubeVimeo, Daily Motion, and Google Videos (which no longer exists). He confided that he actually thought that if anything would make it big, it would be the videos rather than the pictures.

But Popat still decided to create a Flickr account in 2010. “I knew Flickr was going to be a big site, it was owned by Yahoo,” he said. “But it was more of an SEO thing — it wasn’t a social media play but was an SEO play. maximizing for SEO.”

And good SEO paid off.

Popat distinctly remembers checking the site’s traffic on Thursday October 5, 2011, and seeing that the Flickr account jumped from 50 views — after being up for six months! — to 2,000.

“The BuzzFeed writer must have been searching for Halloween stuff and found ours,” Popat said, touting good SEO. “He must have got a kick out of the university aged guys cowering and hugging each other and then he created that great name for it, ‘Scared Bros.'”

An hour later, Tumblr sent over 1,000 more views. “By three or four, we said wouldn’t it be funny if ABC called us.” By the end of the day, ABC along with most other major news corporations had.

From October to December 2011, the Flickr account saw a rise from 50 to 3,500,0000 hits.

But what’s truly amazing about the haunted house’s viral story is that lightening struck twice. Right before Halloween, BuzzFeed and other publications have recirculated the photos and Nightmares Fear Factory is reaping the rewards.

“It’s crazy to us,” Popat said. “Never in my wildest dreams did I think to say we’d go viral again.”

How it helped revenues

Well going viral is all well and good, the real question is how these photos have helped the year-round haunted house.

“Revenue absolutely did increase,” Popat said.

Since the photos spread around the world, surprisingly getting media attention last in Canada itself, international tourists have been stopping by the haunted house on trips to Niagara Falls and telling workers that they saw the photos in their local newspapers.

“I have to view our pictures every single day, and I notice a different demographic coming to the haunted house,” Popat said. “And that’s a result of going viral.”

 

(Girls were scared, too).

Here’s Everything Glenn Beck Gets Wrong About America In His New Jeans Ad

via Business Insider: 

 

Glenn Beck is selling a new line of denim, called “1791,” and he created this 60-second commercial (below) to promote his “American jean.” 

The spot is a melange of images and phrases about the role of jeans in America’s greatness. It’s meant to evoke a feeling, not to be picked apart.

And that’s just as well, because if you think a bit too hard about anything Beck says in the ad, things fall apart quite quickly.

Here are the ad’s problems:

  1. “These were the first American Blue Jeans.” Actually, these are Glenn Beck’s new jeans, circa 2012. Many jeans were made in America before Beck got into the denim business.
  2. “The jeans that built America.” America was “built” largely after 1783, and thus Beck’s jeans had no role in that process. Jeans were actually invented by a German, Levi Strauss, using French cloth, in America.
  3. “Built at a time when things were timeless.” This just doesn’t make sense.
  4. “Americans built locomotives …” The first locomotive was built in England — America’s former colonial master! —in 1804.
  5. “1791. The American jean.” Jeans were not invented until 1853. (Beck is actually referring to the year the Bill of Rights were ratified.) In the 1700s, men wore breeches and women wore large hooped-skirts, made of a variety of materials. In reality, breeches and skirts built America.

These Motorcycles Are Made Out Of Humans And Body Paint

via Business Insider: 

 

The Progressive International Motorcycle Shows are coming up. So what better way to promote it than to body paint dancers, yoga instructors, aerialists and circus performers, and have them contort their bodies into the shapes of motorcycles?

Advanstar Communications Powersports Group teamed up with i.d.e.a. to do just that.

“We sought to combine the art of the motorcycle with true art, thereby elevating the ads to something people would want to look at, enjoy, and share,” i.d.e.a. said of the campaign, which is set to run in 13 markets nationwide.

Speed TV personality and biker Erin Bates also undressed and painted up to ride the three bikes. A speed bike, cruiser, and dirt bike took 18, 15 and 13.5 hours to make, respectively.

If your back is sore just thinking about it, find comfort in the fact that there were two massage therapists on set at all times.

 

It started with sketches of a speed bike.

It started with sketches of a speed bike.

i.d.e.a.

And a dirt bike.

And a dirt bike.

i.d.e.a.

And a finally, a cruiser.

And a finally, a cruiser.

i.d.e.a.

Both the “driver” and the people making up different parts of the bike needed intricate, painted-on costumes.

Both the "driver" and the people making up different parts of the bike needed intricate, painted-on costumes.

i.d.e.a.

Eventually professional body paint artist Trina Mery said, “I got to a point where I felt like I couldn’t sketch it, I just had to work with my hands.”

Eventually professional body paint artist Trina Mery said, "I got to a point where I felt like I couldn't sketch it, I just had to work with my hands."

i.d.e.a.

So she did. There were eight airbrushes on set.

So she did. There were eight airbrushes on set.

i.d.e.a.

These are the people the motorcycles were made out of — flexible dancers, yoga instructors, circus performers, and aerialists.

These are the people the motorcycles were made out of — flexible dancers, yoga instructors, circus performers, and aerialists.

i.d.e.a.

Stretching was necessary …

Stretching was necessary ...

i.d.e.a.

… so they could do this.

... so they could do this.

i.d.e.a.

Pretty realistic, right?

Pretty realistic, right?

i.d.e.a.

Poses were held from between 10 seconds and two minutes.

Poses were held from between 10 seconds and two minutes.

i.d.e.a.

Every hand movement made a difference in the bike’s shape.

Every hand movement made a difference in the bike's shape.

i.d.e.a.

Supercross/Speed TV personality Erin Bates was the primary model.

Supercross/Speed TV personality Erin Bates was the primary model.

i.d.e.a.

Here’s what she looks like in more clothes.

Here's what she looks like in more clothes.

Erin Bates’ Publicity Website

And her job was to ride the human motorcycles. Since she’s a biker, herself, she knew how to adjust the bodies.

And her job was to ride the human motorcycles. Since she's a biker, herself, she knew how to adjust the bodies.

i.d.e.a.

And the resemblance between the actual motorcycles and the human reinventions were uncanny.

And the resemblance between the actual motorcycles and the human reinventions were uncanny.

i.d.e.a.

The dirt bike took 13.5 hours to make.

The dirt bike took 13.5 hours to make.

i.d.e.a.

The cruiser took 15 hours.

The cruiser took 15 hours.

i.d.e.a.

And the speed bike took a whopping 18 hours.

And the speed bike took a whopping 18 hours.

i.d.e.a

Old Milwaukee Really Does Pay For Its Commercials With Beer, Not Money

via Business Insider: 

 

Old Milwaukee, a unit of the PabstBrewing Co., doesn’t like to make a big deal out of its ads. In fact, they seem to deliberately hide them. 

Business Insider has been diligently following their hidden ad gems over the past year, noting that each spot is in equal measure funny, memorable — and difficult to find.

Curious why a brand would do this, we set out to understand Old Milwaukee’s strategy/non-strategy, beginning with a conversation with the creators of, “Hey, Pass Me a Beer,” the latest Old Milwaukee commercial.

Meet Nick and Jack Packard.

Jack and Nick Packard

Jack Packard

 

They are the creative duo behind  “Hey, Pass Me A Beer,” and also happen to be brothers.

During the day, Nick is a marketing consultant, and Jack is the content supervisor for Funny or Die. By night, they are The Packard Brothers, “a truly odd mix of talent that creates a perfect storm of awesome.”

So, here’s the deal with the Old Mil commercial.

While sitting around the house one afternoon, Jack recalls, “we had this idea for beer passing. We did some test shots, and ended up going through three cases of our own beer. We needed more beer (obviously), so we asked Old Mil, and they were nice enough to supply the rest of the beer for the video.”

By the end of filming, they had gone through 192 beers! But, somehow had enough left for “a wicked after party.”

Once the video was edited and produced, the brothers shared it with Old Milwaukee. “They really liked it. But, initially, they wanted to put a harder promotional push behind the video,” said Jack.

Nick and Jack did not agree with this approach. Instead, they convinced Old Milwaukee to let them post the video on Funny or Die’s website to see what would happen.

“It had a very natural build-up,” notes Nick, however, “had there been a money exchange they [Old Milwaukee] would have wanted more control, so because we weren’t really getting paid for it, we were able to do things how we wanted.”

Shortly there after, “the video was illegally uploaded to a YouTube user’s page,” said Jack, and quickly went viral.

At its peak, that video had more than 6.5 million views. The brothers never asked the user to take the video down, only to give them a credit, but eventually the user removed the video. Today, the official video is still on YouTube, and has just over 700,000 views.

Nick went on to say “when videos are taken and put up on other pages that is usually a good thing … It sucks from a monetary point of view, but it’s the internet, so you take the good with the bad.”

Everyone loved working together so much that the brothers are now talking to Old Milwaukee about creating, “Hey, Pass Me a Beer 2.” They are hoping to stage similar beer passing stunts around the equipment at the Old Milwaukee factory. If all goes well, the video should be out sometime during the first half of 2013.

Here’s the video … in case you couldn’t find it.